WHAT NOT TO TALK ABOUT ON A FIRST DATE

WHAT NOT TO TALK ABOUT ON A FIRST DATE

WHAT NOT TO TALK ABOUT ON A FIRST DATE

And that’s your ex-girlfriend or how Donald Trump managed to get elected.

We met in a café. We were about the same age and began chatting. We discovered we were both travelling solo, and enjoyed the same leisure interests.  My American companion suggested a date to a Balinese dance performance the next evening. I accepted.

This year one of my goals is to become a more spontaneous person, instead of over thinking everything. We met, and the conversation veered towards ex’s. Why do lesbians always need to know? Anyway, I launched, without thinking into my tale and I didn’t stop! I couldn’t stop, until I related the whole sad saga.  By the end, she looked shell-shocked!

There was a long awkward silence, when we both sipped at our coconut juices. Then she spoke for 20 minutes, about the effects of a Donald Trump presidency on gay rights, society and America’s standing in the world.

Time for the performance of the Kecak Fire Dance which took place in a temple. Great backdrop, hypnotic chanting, dancing, but I didn’t quite get the story line, but no matter. The finale was quite amazing, as a guy danced on embers! If you get a chance, go, it’s only $8!

As for my date, we became separated in the throng of people while getting a taxi. I shouted out ‘Have a good trip’, I looked round and she had gone.

Yesterday I left Ubud with some relief. The driver spoke good English, and suggested a short tour around South Bali before heading to Sanur. With my new-found spontaneity, I agreed. He drove me to Uluwatu Temple, which has some amazing views, but you can’t visit inside the temple. It’s up a steep climb, and hot in the midday sun.

If you visit after 5pm for the Balinese Dances, be careful of the monkeys. Apparently, they know its food time when the tourists arrive for the evening dancing. It’s quite common for sunglasses and hats to be grabbed from unsuspecting tourists.

Onto Pandawa Beach. This beach is part of a massive construction project to bring more tourists into Bali. Even the Balinese must pay to enter this area. An ugly white road winds down to the beach guarded by police. Looking up I saw a shell of a monstrous building being built. This is a dry area in Bali which doesn’t get much rainfall. The amount of water required will severely replete the underground reserves. Most hotels in Bali bore down into the ground to get their own water supply. What’s going to happen when it runs out?  The Balinese don’t know. Is there a plan? Local farmers are selling their land to developers who construct villas or hotels.  Kind of reminds me of Auckland…..

 

See you next week.

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